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20121224
20130101
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
bonds. medicaid and the children's health insurance program, or chip, which under current law are exempt from the sequester, could be one area where lawmakers look to make cuts. in 2010, more than 40%-- or about $278 billion states received in overall funding-- went to these two programs. >> looking at past proposals, there is a good chance that something like medicaid would be cut, and that would obviously have direct impact on state budgets. but what it would entail is still unknown. >> reporter: also on the table for lawmakers to consider: municipal bonds. they've traditionally been tax- exempt. if that changes, they could become less attractive as an investment vehicle, and end up raising borrowing costs for states and municipalities. >> it would effectively increase the cost of issuing debt to state and local governments, and it's a real consideration at a time when states and local governments are still in repair mode. >> reporter: while some states have built up rainy day funds, credit rating analysts at s&p say for the first time since the start of the financial crisis, the healt
the nation's commerce. >> reporter: the sticking point in negotiations: a decades old law, called the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and t
street more resembles wall street: >> they look around and they say gee, my brother-in-law is still out of work. and things aren't going so well maybe i should save that money rather than investing it. >> reporter: erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: our market guest tonight expects stocks to do well in 2013. he's sam stovall, chief equity strategist at s&p capital i.q. you heard about them talking about the deal and negotiations. does that change your forecast for 2013. >> well susie it confirms that s congress could teach space shake something about drama. >> the head winds have been wit. there is nothing new added to the equation it's just when wil the congress get it's act together. and our belief is if they don't pass something tomorrow they will early in the new year. >> you have been predicting thsw year. barring anymore drama for the fiscal cliff what is going to drive stocks higher. >> most global economies willhat quarter by 2 2012 and much of 23 will be a recovery year. also in the u.s. we are looking for 2-point 2% growth and expanding in 2014. and in an in an earni
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)